Email Sign-Up

Archive for the ‘INFORMATIONAL’ Category

How I want to be buried…

Tuesday, April 17, 2012 Review by BetterThanAndrew

Bacon Coffin

So those mad geniuses at Bacon Salt have done it again. They have come up with a fo’ realz bacon coffin that is on sale in their online store for the paltry sum of $2999.00.

“This genuine bacon casket is made of 18 Gauge Gasketed Steel with Premium Bacon Exterior/Interior, and includes a Memorial and Record Tube, Adjustable Bed and Mattress and Stationary and Swingbar handles. It also includes a bacon air freshener for when you get that buried-underground, not-so-fresh feeling.”

And you better believe that I’m serious as a bacon-induced heart attack when I tell you that had my tax return been big enough, I would have bought one and converted it into a couch for my man cave. I guess it’ll have to wait for now.

Just Google “Bacon coffin” for links to detailed articles from many credible news sources.

The Bacon Bacon Truck in San Fran

Friday, March 30, 2012 Review by Brian

The Bacon Bacon Truck

The Bacon Bacon Truck San Fran

Ran across this dreamy food truck on Twitter. Food looks pretty good. Has anyone tried the food? Comments?

Check them out online and let us know what you think: http://www.baconbaconsf.com/

Old Mountain Cast Iron Bacon Press

Thursday, December 15, 2011 Review by BetterThanAndrew

Bacon press

As mentioned previously, I recently tied the knot with The Vegetarian. As many of you know, the pre-wedding period involves showers, where the couples receive gifty things. Well, my now mother-in-law, well knowing of my shadowy superhero-esque alter ego of BetterThanAndrew, vigilante baconologist, was appalled that I didn’t have a bacon press. Being the upstanding enabler that she is, she rectified the situation by begifting me an Old Mountain cast iron press.

It’s quite the beefy (err, porky) unit. I’m not sure where it tips the scales but it strikes me as being around the 4-5 lb mark. Then again, I’m a terrible estimator so I could be way off. (Edit: confirmed at around 4 lbs) It’s hefty, though. It measures in at about 7.5″ in diameter and centers nicely in the flat portion of a 10″ skillet. It’s got enough surface area to cover 4 good slices vertically. It was pre-seasoned, which was convenient. No fussing with baking it in the oven for a couple hours before I could use it to smash some swine.

Construction is solid, IMHO. I don’t have other presses to compare it to but my meter is that I’m pretty sure that if I was attacked by a secret agent assassin in my kitchen I could use it to deflect his gunfire and then smash his face in, Jason Bourne style, with no consequential damage to the press. The handle is attached by two beveled flat head phillips screws, flush with the pressing surface so there’s no concerns with scratching your cookware, and secured topside with a washer and nut. A crush nut or split-washer would instill more confidence but I’m not terribly concerned about the nuts coming loose, even after assassin attack. If they did it’d be a quick fix with a screwdriver and a wrench (or pliars, or what have you, if you’re not someone with a Bob Villa-endorsed workbench). The handle is a nice chromed steel with a coiled grip. I’ve never had issues with it heating up during use and it has excellent knuckle clearance from the press surface. Some of the “competing” units I’ve since seen online have a stubby wooden knob or similar grip that’s looks like a quick ticket to blisterville if you’re not careful. The only downside I’ve found is that the heads of the screws can get grease packed up in them during the cooking process. All that really means is an extra couple seconds during the cleaning process, though. It’s of very small concern in the grand scheme of things.

It does what it was designed to do very well. It prevents curling, speeds up cooking time and evenness, and reduces spatter, even better than my old pan screens did. Clean up is a breeze. Hot water and a bit of Dawn and she’s all ready for another round with that smiling pig looking up at you as if to say “Anything I can do to help, sir!” It’s the quintessential bacon preparation tool, besides tongs, and I’m ashamed it’s taken me this long to own one. Bacon tested, BetterThanAndrew approved!

This bad boy is available from a number of online retailers for under $20.00. Do your bacon proud!

How to tell real whiskey from fake — faster!

Monday, July 25, 2011 Review by Brian

Methods for distinguishing between authentic and counterfeit Scotch whisky brands have been devised by scientists at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow.

Read more: http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-07-real-whiskey-fake-faster.html

Beal? Lacon? Veal Bacon!

Friday, April 15, 2011 Review by BetterThanAndrew

pamb

So I flipped the page on my Bacon Love Mini Day Calendar and I came to an entry that stated “Veal Bacon has half the calories of pork bacon and 35% less fat. Many chefs are using veal bacon as a new twist on upscale dining”.

Where was I when this memo was issued?!?

Now I know that we here at baconscotch.com are rather puritan in our ways. Turkey bacon? Heathen! Veggie bacon? How DARE you! Bacon is pork and don’t you ever forget it. However straight laced and devoted I may be to the purity of porcine products, the foodie and general carnivore in me can’t turn a blind eye to this likely delicious bastardization of the form.

A cursory Google search pulled up very little on the subject. It appears that Veal Bacon is still lurking in the shadows of the gastronomic world. Like Sasquatch or Nessie, only making itself known to a lucky few in the right place at the right time. A few others like myself have tried to track the wily beast but with little luck. Here’s what I was able to find out, mostly from posts and snippets on chow.com.

Veal Bacon

1. Veal has less fat and therefore is less rich in flavor than pork bacon, and it isn’t as crispy when cooked.
2. Three manufacturers now produce veal bacon: Swissland Packing Co., of Ashkum, III.; Catelli Brothers of Collingswood, N.J.; and Strauss Veal, Inc. of Franklin, Wis. SYSCO, the largest foodservice distributor in the country distributes veal bacon to the foodservice marketplace. The rest is made in-house by some restauranteurs. There’s also a blog entry on how to make your own here
3. Veal bacon is often cured but not smoked so it’s not truly bacon, but more like a pancetta.
4. I want to try some very badly.

So there you have it. Now that it’s on your radar, be on the look out for it. Bonus points if you can get me a sample 😉